The Tricopter: a three bladed 'helicopter'

The Tricopter is an adaptation of an aircraft of the same name designed by 'Lemmiwinks' at RCGroups.  The tricopter is a fun to build and fun to fly project designed around readily available hobby shop components.  While the costs can add up quickly, the resulting aircraft is sure to draw a lot of attention (and who doesn't love that?)
Before we begin
Building the Tricopter turned out to be pretty straightforward.  Having a very good understanding of how gyro's work, and understanding the difference between a rate based gyro and a heading hold gyro are both important to successfully trimming this aircraft to fly, since too much gain on the gyros can result in some spectacular oscillations.

Details
The platform base is an equilateral triangle cut out of red corroplast.  The booms are thin wall carbon fiber tubing.  Structurally,  all of the rigidity could be focused at the points where the CF tubes meet, meaning the platform could have been as thin as I would have liked.  I went with corroplast because I had it laying around, and used packing tape to attach the CF tubes.  Three guy wires run between the ends of the CF tubes to increase rigidity.  The 3 rate gyros were the cheapest I could find (GWS PG-03).  The heading hold gyro is a Futaba GY240, and the receiver a Hitec superslim 8 channel (overkill, but it's what I had laying around)

This is the tilt mechanism used for yaw control.  An HS56 servo runs to the GY240, which is then plugged into the yaw channel of the receiver.  Tilting the motor causes the aircraft to yaw left or right.  Pitch and roll are managed by setting my radio (a Futaba 9c) to helicopter mode,120 degree ccpm.  Normally 3 servos would be connected to control the tilt of the swashplate on a helicopter, but in this implementation the 3 channels are used to drive 3 CC25 brushless controllers.  Mechanically this makes for a very simple aircraft.  Perhaps the most complicated part was designing the tilt mechanism. for the yaw servo. Click here for more views of the pivot mechanism.